Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

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Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

Postby Media » Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:32 am

Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

From Foot Locker to Under Armour, companies that fed the athletic-footwear frenzy need new strategies to stay fresh.

Some of the biggest names in the athletic-gear business are shooting an air ball.

Foot Locker Inc.'s saw a quarter of its market value erased in a single day last week when it reported dismal earnings results. Dick's Sporting Goods Inc. shares sank 23 percent last Tuesday when it announced disappointing earnings. Not long before that, Under Armour Inc. reported that sales in its once fast-growing footwear division had declined in the most recent quarter.

Their collective weakness stands out after so many years in which sporty styles have reigned supreme in the retail world. Teens and millennials have reliably shelled out for sneakers with three-figure price tags and the "athleisure" trend has had many of us dressing in gym-inspired gear for all sorts of occasions.
What's going on? Is the trouble at these companies a sign that these sartorial mega-trends are flaming out? Not necessarily. But the landscape of this business has changed, and brands and retailers need to adjust to new realities.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... er-fatigue
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Re: Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

Postby MBRer » Thu Oct 12, 2017 5:31 am

Matt Powell‏Verified account @NPDMattPowell
More Bad News for Under Armour: Teens Have Moved On http://www.barrons.com/articles/more-ba ... 1507760172 … via @BarronsNext
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Re: Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

Postby bcbc55 » Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:23 pm

Media wrote:Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

From Foot Locker to Under Armour, companies that fed the athletic-footwear frenzy need new strategies to stay fresh.

Some of the biggest names in the athletic-gear business are shooting an air ball.

Foot Locker Inc.'s saw a quarter of its market value erased in a single day last week when it reported dismal earnings results. Dick's Sporting Goods Inc. shares sank 23 percent last Tuesday when it announced disappointing earnings. Not long before that, Under Armour Inc. reported that sales in its once fast-growing footwear division had declined in the most recent quarter.

Their collective weakness stands out after so many years in which sporty styles have reigned supreme in the retail world. Teens and millennials have reliably shelled out for sneakers with three-figure price tags and the "athleisure" trend has had many of us dressing in gym-inspired gear for all sorts of occasions.
What's going on? Is the trouble at these companies a sign that these sartorial mega-trends are flaming out? Not necessarily. But the landscape of this business has changed, and brands and retailers need to adjust to new realities.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... er-fatigue
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Re: Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

Postby bcbc55 » Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:33 pm

Media wrote:Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

From Foot Locker to Under Armour, companies that fed the athletic-footwear frenzy need new strategies to stay fresh.

Some of the biggest names in the athletic-gear business are shooting an air ball.

Foot Locker Inc.'s saw a quarter of its market value erased in a single day last week when it reported dismal earnings results. Dick's Sporting Goods Inc. shares sank 23 percent last Tuesday when it announced disappointing earnings. Not long before that, Under Armour Inc. reported that sales in its once fast-growing footwear division had declined in the most recent quarter.

Their collective weakness stands out after so many years in which sporty styles have reigned supreme in the retail world. Teens and millennials have reliably shelled out for sneakers with three-figure price tags and the "athleisure" trend has had many of us dressing in gym-inspired gear for all sorts of occasions.
What's going on? Is the trouble at these companies a sign that these sartorial mega-trends are flaming out? Not necessarily. But the landscape of this business has changed, and brands and retailers need to adjust to new realities.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... er-fatigue


media: I can remember as a player in junior high school from 1949-52, high school 1952-55 and college 1955-58 sneakers were high cut white SPAULDING at $10.00.

Playing in Elementary school from 1947-49 I cannot remember what we wore for sneakers.

Then high cut CONVERSE came in to challenge SPAULDING.

I think if I remember right there also was a brand called U.S. KEDS at about the same time in the late 40's and 50's.

Of course SPAULDING WAS A NATIONAL ATHLETIC SUPPLIES FRANCHISE nationwide.

A little ancient history about basketball sneakers.
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Re: Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

Postby rasputin » Sat Oct 14, 2017 7:10 am

bcbc55 wrote:
Media wrote:Defending Against Sneaker Fatigue

From Foot Locker to Under Armour, companies that fed the athletic-footwear frenzy need new strategies to stay fresh.

Some of the biggest names in the athletic-gear business are shooting an air ball.

Foot Locker Inc.'s saw a quarter of its market value erased in a single day last week when it reported dismal earnings results. Dick's Sporting Goods Inc. shares sank 23 percent last Tuesday when it announced disappointing earnings. Not long before that, Under Armour Inc. reported that sales in its once fast-growing footwear division had declined in the most recent quarter.

Their collective weakness stands out after so many years in which sporty styles have reigned supreme in the retail world. Teens and millennials have reliably shelled out for sneakers with three-figure price tags and the "athleisure" trend has had many of us dressing in gym-inspired gear for all sorts of occasions.
What's going on? Is the trouble at these companies a sign that these sartorial mega-trends are flaming out? Not necessarily. But the landscape of this business has changed, and brands and retailers need to adjust to new realities.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... er-fatigue


media: I can remember as a player in junior high school from 1949-52, high school 1952-55 and college 1955-58 sneakers were high cut white SPAULDING at $10.00.

Playing in Elementary school from 1947-49 I cannot remember what we wore for sneakers.

Then high cut CONVERSE came in to challenge SPAULDING.

I think if I remember right there also was a brand called U.S. KEDS at about the same time in the late 40's and 50's.

Of course SPAULDING WAS A NATIONAL ATHLETIC SUPPLIES FRANCHISE nationwide.

A little ancient history about basketball sneakers.

$10 in 1952 is $92 today
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