National Letter of Intent

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National Letter of Intent

Postby Miren » Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:04 pm

Will any Maine kids be signing?
November 8, 2017 to November 15, 2017
http://www.nationalletter.org/signingDates/future.html
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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby bcbc55 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:01 pm

Miren wrote:Will any Maine kids be signing?
November 8, 2017 to November 15, 2017
http://www.nationalletter.org/signingDates/future.html


Miren: Why would any player with D-1 potential want to sign this early. The only time that they and their parents are in control is before they sign on the dotted line of a letter of intent. Better to wait until April-May signing period then to do it now.

A lot of things may happen from now until next spring.

Besides any Maine High School player who really wants to be an impact player in D-1 as a college freshmen needs to go to prep school for a year.

If they can't get a prep school scholarship then they probably are not D-1 material.

Advantages to going to prep school after high school are as follows:

1. Another year to mature physically and mentally
2. A year to play and practice against much better talent then in high school
3. Get used to living away from home
4. Know what level of D-1 you really belong based on what level you get the most offers from
5. Get used to longer and more demanding practices
6. Get used to the travel
7. Get used to longer season schedule of games

Many more pluses then minuses if a Maine high school D-1 prospect goes to Prep School after high school for a year.
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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby Miren » Thu Nov 09, 2017 7:59 am

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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby bcbc55 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 1:53 pm



Miren: Thanks for the article. The few high school players I coached and who went on to play D-1 did not sign early. They waited and signed in the spring.

I still feel that it is better for the players to wait.

I advised those players to go to prep school and none did. But they did come back and tell me that they wished they had taken my advice and gone to prep school.

They felt that they were not ready to be an impact player as a freshmen directly out of high school especially coming from Maine.

Also when contacted and asked for advice to a player and his family from another high school after he received no D-1 offers as he played out of position in high school because he was 6'5" and forced to play center when he really was a face the basket wing.

He went to a highly competitive prep school in New England and averaged 22 points a game s a face the basket wing and ended up with more than 15 D1 offers after his year of prep.

He ended up at a mid major D-1 college with a 4 year scholarship and played well there and got plenty of minutes.
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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby bulldog » Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:50 am

bcbc55 wrote: Why would any player with D-1 potential want to sign this early


Coach Cim,
I truly enjoy your input regarding basketball and your honesty regarding your feelings and beliefs, but I have to disagree with this advice pertaining to signing an NLI during the early stage. I understand your point of view and a years growth and maturity at a prep school is a valid point. My feeling is that if a student-athlete is offered an opportunity to sign a NLI during the early period with a scholarship in hand and the student-athlete feels comfortable with the school and the coaching staff, then take it and run. If a scholarship is being offered, then the staff must feel that the student-athlete has the POTENTIAL to play at some point. I would often imagine it is the case at the collegiate level, that when money is offered, it is offered to more than one player who all posses the same skill ability and maturity, and the first player to accept will get the scholarship and the others lose out. Then, once a player gets to the institution, the competition for playing time is not guaranteed, but must be earned and the player must show the confidence and ability to handle the speed and skill level of the game at the next level.

Again, I enjoy your input and point of view and look forward to your commentary throughout the high school and collegiate season.
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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby LennyH » Sat Nov 11, 2017 12:03 pm

Certainly Pros and Cons to both. There are two issues I believe should weigh on the decisions. The first as Coach has mentioned are you going to Prep on scholarship or are you paying for it? I have seen WAY too many kids waste $25-30K chasing a dream that isn't likely going to happen, if it has not already. As Bulldog mentioned much of Recruiting is speculating on where a player will be in 2-3 years, if a Senior has no offers, heading off to Prep is not likely to provide any, especially on the boys side where so much of the formula is based on athleticism - and a year of prep is not going to make you more athletic. If there is Prep scholarship available, this is because the player being offered it is DEFINITELY projected as a scholarship collegiate player. They don't offer those scholarships to kids on the fence.

Second, there is strong chance going to Prep will either offer more exposure or the player will be exposed. I had one very successful DII coach tell me he would much rather recruit kids out of Prep play because the coaches there game plan against each other. When he goes to an AAU/Club Tournament, the teams don't have in depth scouting reports so a players weaknesses are not likely to be as exposed. Therefore, I would agree with Bulldog, if you have an offer, you are good with the program and staff, it might make sense to sign early. (there are also injuries to worry about)
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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby bulldog » Sat Nov 11, 2017 12:17 pm

Lenny,
Very insightful information and logical thought process. Certainly, there are different situations for different student-athletes. The percentage of student-athletes who play at the DI, and DII level and receive athletic based aid is far and few between, and those that are offered have to make quick decisions or the scholarship is offered to another person. Also, different sports have different philosophies regarding recruiting. As you stated, recruiting is about projecting a student-athletes ability and maturity 2 to 3 years down the road and thinking that is when the prospective student-athlete will be able to contribute. Unfortunately, the patience of student athletes today is short as it is with many parents. Realisitically, the college process is much like the high school process...it takes time to develop strength and gain experience to master the skill and speed of the game at the next level.

I also would have a student-athlete take the scholarship offer, sign the NLI and if need be, redshirt their first year in college, practice against better and older players, learn to compete, work under the leadership of the coaches, both game and strength, and learn to handle the academic rigours of college. Student-athletes that can adjust to the academic rigours, and athletic committment at the next level are usually the ones who have the most success. People don't realize that not only do student-athletes attend classes and practice, they are also required to be in the weightroom, attend organized study halls, and to adjust to the social component that goes along with being away from home.
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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby bcbc55 » Sat Nov 11, 2017 2:22 pm

Lenny and Bulldog: You both make good points.

However, if a Maine player is good enough to get a prep school scholarship then he probably is a good D-1 prospect at least for the lowest level of D-1.

Also, what happens if a prospect signs early and then the coach leaves for another position before the next school year starts.

How does the prospect know how he fits into the new coach's plans coming in'?

If he transfers he has to sit out a year.

The coach who left gets to coach and get paid and the player he signed early is left holding the bag.

Also, don't forget these scholarships are not four 4 years as
players now are evaluated every spring to see if their scholarship is going to be renewed. One year scholarships are a lot different then when it was a 4 year deal.

If a player red-shirts as a freshmen to develop and then decides to transfer to another D-1 school then he loses a year of eligibility as he gets 5 years to play 4, but red-shirting means if you transfer it is 5 years to play 3.

This situation of signing early is not a case or situation of "a bird in the hand is worth 2 in the bush"....It is in my opinion and experience of having had players come back to me and tell me they should have gone to prep school on the prep school scholarship instead if going directly to college as a freshmen. (They had prep school scholarships if they wanted them).

Not a case of the "early bird gets the worm", but instead might me a case of "elevator, elevator he gets the shaft", by signing early.

If a player gets a prep school scholarship then he really knows after the prep season what level of D-1 basketball he really belongs at by the number of teams that offer to sign him be it the major, mid-major or low major.

The key is getting a prep school scholarship, not to sign early.

Again, just my opinion based on my experience with players being D-1 prospects.

Having had a few high school players heavily recruited one by over 60 D-1 schools and 1 over 30 D-1 offers the recruiters were always about what was best for them not for the individual player as NONE ever, ever mentioned prep school because they were afraid to lose the recruit to a school with a higher ranking, if he goes to prep school.

If we asked the recruiters about prep school, they replied no way they did not recommend that for the reason above, but they didn't tell you that.

Again, just my opinion, and like noses everyone has one.

By not signing early (IF YOU GET A PREP SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP) is having "time and patience neither of which come in a bottle" even if you are in a drug store.
"What's that old saying? "Haste makes waste"? So long as you have that prep school schollie.
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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby bulldog » Sat Nov 11, 2017 3:40 pm

Thanks for the response Coach Cim and your point is well taken.

But the issue is the scholarship at hand with the National Letter of Intent. With an NLI, the value comes from the coach making the offer and student visits to the school to determine if the school is a fit for the student-athlete. Coaches may come and go at any time so this point is irrelevant as to whether one goes to prep school or not, the player cannot determine what a coach does. Also, if a scholarship is a renewable scholarship each year, then going to prep school or not is also irrelevant once the student-athlete enrolls in the 4 year institution. In my opinion, the only thing a year of prep school provides is a year of physical growth and maturity, plus the clock for the 5 years to play 4 begins a year later. This I can see as a benefit to a year of prep school. I don't ever remember scholarships being given out as four year committments, I always thought they had to be renewed each year anyways. I would think it would be a concern if a coach earned the reputation of running kids out who didn't materialize as players because the coaches ability to evaluate was hit and miss.

I do see some value in a year of prep school if the student-athlete is academically deficient and needs a year of academic maturity to handle the demands of academically and athletically playing at the next level.

Now this is my opinion and I respect your belief that a year of prep school is the most benefitial if the player can get a prep school scholarship. What I find interesting is the number of Maine basketball players who have left their high school and reclassified in prep school to gain a year of eligibility and growth. I am with Lenny in that I don't believe that spending thousands of dollars on prep school to chase the dream of getting a scholarship. The chances are remote.

This is an interesting discussion.
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Re: National Letter of Intent

Postby bcbc55 » Sat Nov 11, 2017 9:33 pm

bulldog wrote:Lenny,
Very insightful information and logical thought process. Certainly, there are different situations for different student-athletes. The percentage of student-athletes who play at the DI, and DII level and receive athletic based aid is far and few between, and those that are offered have to make quick decisions or the scholarship is offered to another person. Also, different sports have different philosophies regarding recruiting. As you stated, recruiting is about projecting a student-athletes ability and maturity 2 to 3 years down the road and thinking that is when the prospective student-athlete will be able to contribute. Unfortunately, the patience of student athletes today is short as it is with many parents. Realisitically, the college process is much like the high school process...it takes time to develop strength and gain experience to master the skill and speed of the game at the next level.

I also would have a student-athlete take the scholarship offer, sign the NLI and if need be, redshirt their first year in college, practice against better and older players, learn to compete, work under the leadership of the coaches, both game and strength, and learn to handle the academic rigours of college. Student-athletes that can adjust to the academic rigours, and athletic committment at the next level are usually the ones who have the most success. People don't realize that not only do student-athletes attend classes and practice, they are also required to be in the weightroom, attend organized study halls, and to adjust to the social component that goes along with being away from home.


Bulldog: I agree if the player has to pay for the year at prep school, but if he gets a scholarship which I got my players get to go to prep school and when they didn't go they came back and said they should have gone to prep school, as they said another year would have made a big difference in playing time for them as a freshmen right out of high school compared to one with a year of prep.

Four year scholarships were the scholarship offers before they changed them to 1 year.

Again Maine players just do not have the experience against quality competition in high school, too few games in high school 18 to 23 depending what you do if you make the post season tournament. Also, they only have 5 allowable dates for exhibition games, although they can play multiple games on those 5 dates.

Very few if any D-1 out of state recruiters come to Maine during the regular and post season times today. They go to AAU tournaments when they are allowed by NCAA rules for evaluations and they can see hundreds of players at the Nationals at one site.

Also, they see potential recruits with and against much better competition then what they would see in Maine.

Remember the player who was an opponent and did not get any D-1 offers because he played with his back to the basket for his team because he was the biggest player on his team. Got him a scholarship at a prep school and because it was in March and most of the prep school money was gone, he only got half the tuition and he paid the other half. He played the right position facing he basket on a wing there averaged 22 ppg and received 15 plus D-1 offers and went to a mid major D-1 school and had a excellent 4 year career.
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