No, your kid is not a superstar

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No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby hoops88 » Thu Sep 06, 2018 9:16 am

Unfulfilled dreams that parents are trying to push onto their kids? Remember when sports was just fun?

https://www.yahoo.com/news/unfiltered-y ... 57302.html
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby ExpoEddie » Fri Sep 07, 2018 8:52 am

Nice read. Great insight.
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby reffanfan » Fri Sep 07, 2018 1:09 pm

the followup story was "High School Coach: You are not Dean Smith"
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby ball2112 » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:46 am

Great watch. I have done some youth sports reffing and witnessed almost the same types of accounts as the man in this video. And he is right, it is a disease and an epidemic. Here is some insight for why I think some of these people think it is okay to behave in these manners.

First, hollywood movies and professional sports have influenced people to think this is what sports is about, "drama". The dramatic affect to sports should only be the great competition and a respectful win and loss. Instead our culture has this idea that competitive means to "win at all costs" which includes this kind of behavior. The only way to win is to be intense, or the only way to win is to have the refs on your side, whatever it may be. That being said, my issue regarding this is that people are allowed to act this way, yell at referees in disrespectful tones, treat other teams players and coaches with disrespectful words and tones, because they believe in "enemies". Some of the toughest, hardest fought competitions I have played in when I played sports were against guys that I now see and speak to and have even made friends with. They were never enemies. They were competition on the court, but human beings on and off the court. We forget that we are all humans every second of every day no matter what we are doing.

My last insight is this generation of parents and more to come are being faced with a different way of sports than it used to be. Back in the day, there was no travel ball, AAU ball, and teams to play on year round. Families enjoyed watching there sons and daughters play sports for their school, and that commitment was not a huge financial burden or commitment on the parents. Now, we are seeing travel ball, AAU, and other forms of teams that kids want to play on. Parents are spending thousands and thousands of dollars a year on expenses and travel for their kid to play, following them around and trucking them around all over their state, surrounding states, and even around the country. DO NOT GET ME WRONG, this is a great opportunity for kids and people that know how to handle it. That being said, this generation has a great deal of parents that cannot handle this. They are so financially and emotionally invested due to the high time and financial commitment that they feel it is just as much theirs as it is the kid. When in reality, you should be making the commitment for your kid to make the best of it. To be the best they can be, to learn work ethic, to learn the values and lessons the sport has to teach.

I am someone who has been fortunate enough to experience playing the sport I have loved all year round through middle school and high school, and my opportunities were great and I learned a great deal from it. But the epidemic is real that these parents are beginning to believe it is theirs just as much as it is their little Jonny and Susie.
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby hoops88 » Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:53 am

I had to log in to say, nice post ball2112.
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby ExpoEddie » Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:48 am

Agree.
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby lovethegame » Fri Sep 28, 2018 11:11 am

Yes, nice post ball 2112.

Another issue with today's parents is that a large majority of them think that their investment of time and money equals entitlement and guaranteed opportunity. This kind of piggy-backs on much of what you said, and it is truly not the case.
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby driveandive » Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:44 pm

lovethegame wrote:Yes, nice post ball 2112.

Another issue with today's parents is that a large majority of them think that their investment of time and money equals entitlement and guaranteed opportunity.


How is that possible? They are way to old to be millenials.
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby ExpoEddie » Sat Sep 29, 2018 1:11 pm

Millenials do not put any money in. They expect everyone else to pay for it and reap the all benefits too.
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Re: No, your kid is not a superstar

Postby lovethegame » Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:48 pm

driveandive wrote:
lovethegame wrote:Yes, nice post ball 2112.

Another issue with today's parents is that a large majority of them think that their investment of time and money equals entitlement and guaranteed opportunity.


How is that possible? They are way to old to be millenials.


driveanddive, I can't tell if you're being serious or facetious, but the answer to your question is that the parents of the millenials, or many of the children today, are starting to embrace the same entitlement effects that their kids have. This is happening mainly because of ego and the need to be recognized or acknowledged. Many of them show the mentality of "My time plus my money equals playing time and unearned benefits for my child." It truly is a sad thing to witness. I have seen many good, wholesome, understanding players be embarrassed and turned off of the sport that they once loved because of their parent's actions and mindset. On the other end of the spectrum though, I have seen, just like many others on here have seen, how an unrealistic parent can twist and almost brainwash their child into believing that they're better than they actually are and push the child to carry out the parent's own ego-driven thoughts of grandeur. Both are extremely sad and unfortunate for the child/player. So my money/time/investment comment ties into that.
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