D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

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D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

Postby bcbc55 » Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:59 pm

The colleges put in the 3 point shot in the mid 80's and teams don't seem to shoot any better today from beyond the arc today then they did earlier, but they sure seem to rely on it more today.

Many teams at all levels appear to want to "live by the three or die by the three".

The 3 point shot has effected the high school game more than any rule change.The shot clock affected the college and Pro game more than the 3 point shot. .

There are currently only 39of the 351 D-1 men's college basketball teams shooting over 40% from the 3 point line so far this 2017-18 season.

Over.. 40%.. 38 teams Evansville is number one at 48.7%
35%-39.9%..100 teams
30%-34.8%..165 teams
25%-29.9%...43 teams Maine 330th @ 28.2%/Last Year 31.6%
0--24.9%......5 teams
Total teams 351 teams

Excellent 3 point shooting teams shoot 40% or better because they seem to go inside-outside to make most of their open 3's.

Above average 3 point shooting teams shoot 35%-39.9% because they seem to use dribble penetration and kick outs from the post to make most of their open threes

Average 3 point shooting teams shoot 30%-34.9% because they seem to use perimeter passes to make most of their 3's

Below average 3 point shooting teams shoot 30% and below because they seem to use shooting off dribble more to make most of their 3's

Many teams today at all levels seem to have increased the number of 3 points attempts out of their total of FGA's per game.

My opinion is that teams should not take more than 20% of their teams field goals as 3 pointers. The poorer a team shoots the 3 percentage wise the fewer threes they should rely on in their offense, especially at the high school level where there is no shot clock.

In the college and Pro game because of the shot clock it can increase 3 attempts to 33% of their FGA's.

The negatives of the 3 is that the misses bounce farther away from the basket thus cutting down on offensive rebounding, plus starting the defenses fast breaks because of the long rebounds. Also, shooting 3's cuts down on a teams the trips to the foul line.

Many high school players and coaches seem to be trying to imitate what they see on TV in college and NBA games by wanting to rely on the 3 more.

But, they may forget that the college and NBA take more 3's because the games are longer and becasue of the shot clock.
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Re: D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

Postby Maine19Fan » Sun Dec 17, 2017 12:31 pm

One quick point: Actually, there are MORE offensive rebounds as a result of missed three-point attempts.
The reason being that the defense almost always has inside position for rebounding.
Long rebounds come out to boxed-out offensive players.
Also, any team that shoots above 30% is getting good production from 3-point range.
Since the 3 is worth 50% more than the 2, that's like shooting 45%.
How many college teams at the mid-major level shoot better than 45%?
Plus, because the team taking the 3 has a better chance at a rebound (longer rebounds), missed 3's result in more second-chance opportunities.
As of right now, Maine is making 30.2 % of its three-pointers, so not terrible.
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Re: D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

Postby bcbc55 » Sun Dec 17, 2017 7:02 pm

Maine19Fan wrote:One quick point: Actually, there are MORE offensive rebounds as a result of missed three-point attempts.
The reason being that the defense almost always has inside position for rebounding.
Long rebounds come out to boxed-out offensive players.
Also, any team that shoots above 30% is getting good production from 3-point range.
Since the 3 is worth 50% more than the 2, that's like shooting 45%.
How many college teams at the mid-major level shoot better than 45%?
Plus, because the team taking the 3 has a better chance at a rebound (longer rebounds), missed 3's result in more second-chance opportunities.
As of right now, Maine is making 30.2 % of its three-pointers, so not terrible.


Maine19Fan:

1. Not for put backs.
2. For more 3 attemots
3. Good math
4. Not many
5. Not for put backs, and old fashion 3's, just 3 attempts, how many tims do you see a 3 poin t shooter get fouled?
6. Yeah, today they shot 35% versus St. Joe's and still lost by more than 10 and they are 1-9 against D-1 opponents, so that's not to terrible????????????????

"Live by the three, die by the three" especially in one and done situations come conference tourney times.

Maine has lived once and died 9 times. Good percentage?????????????????????????????????????
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Re: D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

Postby Maine19Fan » Mon Dec 18, 2017 7:32 pm

Did you ever think that teams take threes because they think it's a weapon?
Or that they don't have a great inside game?
Also, did you know that Maine averages 0.92 points for every three-point shot it has attempted, but only 0.80 for every two-point shot attempted?
A wide-open three-point shot has been proven, analytically, to be the best shot in basketball other than an uncontested layup.

Also, Maine's percentage of 3-point attempts is about in line with the trend nationally. It takes 43.6% of its shots from beyond the 3-point line.
I just took two arbitrary teams from America East for comparison: UMBC takes 47.7% of its shots from beyond the line. New Hampshire takes 44.3% of its shots from 3-point range.
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Re: D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

Postby bcbc55 » Mon Dec 18, 2017 8:55 pm

Maine19Fan wrote:Did you ever think that teams take threes because they think it's a weapon?
Or that they don't have a great inside game?
Also, did you know that Maine averages 0.92 points for every three-point shot it has attempted, but only 0.80 for every two-point shot attempted?
A wide-open three-point shot has been proven, analytically, to be the best shot in basketball other than an uncontested layup.

Also, Maine's percentage of 3-point attempts is about in line with the trend nationally. It takes 43.6% of its shots from beyond the 3-point line.
I just took two arbitrary teams from America East for comparison: UMBC takes 47.7% of its shots from beyond the line. New Hampshire takes 44.3% of its shots from 3-point range.


Maine19Fan: I know that definitely look at how many teams over use the three.,
But not many have a good inside game.
But did you know the highest percentage 3 is from inside-outside not the other ways.
You don't want to be a back to the basket player today as the only times you get the ball on a regular basis is on the defensive boards...certainly not from teammates on an entry passes. Many have to call time out when they happen to get tha ball on the offensive block with a pass from a teammate because they are so surprised they got it. They do that to see if the ball is still round because they only get it previously when the get it on the defensive boards that it is round when they get on the defensive end of the court and want to know if it is still round when they get it on the offensive end after they give the ball to one of those 3 point shooting guards.
Best percentage shot for a 3 comes from an inside outside kick out pass because shooter is already squared to the basket.

However, tough to survive a bad night in the one and done season of tournament conference qualification for the big dance. "living and dying by the three". Doesn't take a lot of coaching to rely on the 3 game....except to go inside outside to get the open threes which few coaches have their 3 point shooting teams do...Next highest percentage is dribble penetration and kick out to stationary player, next is ball reversal perimeter passing to stationary player, next is coming of screens to get perimeter shot, next is coming off screens to the ball while dribbling and last is off the dribble one on on. See a lot of everything listed except inside outside to force the double down to double screen the post player with or without the ball. Of course it would help if the offensive team had the correct player spacing so as to make it difficult to for the defense to double team the block without gibing up an open three to good 3 point shooter if his defender is the man who doubles down or a uncontested layup if the offensive player whose man left him to double down is not a good 3 point shooter who can go to the opposite block for a wide open layu
Remember just agreeing to disagree and this is just my opinion.

Also, good coaches coach for the tournament all season long and over using the 3 is an easy way out for coaches to IF we had made our 3's.

P.S. How many offensive rebounds do post players get when a 3 is the shot taken because they bounce farther away from the rim then 2 pointers and usually the post player has come all side hoping, praying for a touch so they are ball side when the shot is taken and that puts them out of offensive rebound shooting especially if the ball is shot as a 3 from the foul line extended to the corner the more the ball is shot missed it usually goes to the other side of the rim and court on the miss.
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Re: D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

Postby Maine19Fan » Mon Dec 18, 2017 9:40 pm

Hard to understand what you're trying to say.
But, as you know, the best shot in basketball is the wide-open shot.
It can occur in a number of ways.
There are two great shots in basketball: the uncontested layup/dunk, and the wide-open three-pointer.
You contend that it's hard to make an entry pass to the post.
Have you noticed that, in recent years, defensive players rotate a lot more ... in man defenses, the weakside defenders play off their man and help clog up the post.
That makes it inadvisable to try to pass it inside when a proficient big is double-teammed before the ball gets there.
The better method to create an open shot is crisp passing (the ball moves faster than the feet), getting defenders a half step behind. It opens up not only better shots but better lanes to the basket.
And, yes, as you contend, a drive and dish is very effective.

Here's the other point. Obviously your references are to low mid-major level basketball.
So, here's a question for you: How many teams at Maine's level have a quality "big," at least 6-foot-8.
There are only so many individuals 6-8 or taller on earth. There's an even smaller percentage that have some athletic gifts. The all matriculate at the higher levels, leaving teams of Maine's levels without quality bigs.
When is the last time Maine had a legit 6-8+ player who averaged, say,16 or 17 points per game?
Other than Warney, at Stony Brook a couple of years ago, what America East team had a legit, effective 6-8 player?
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Re: D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

Postby bcbc55 » Mon Dec 18, 2017 10:31 pm

Maine19Fan wrote:Hard to understand what you're trying to say.
But, as you know, the best shot in basketball is the wide-open shot.
It can occur in a number of ways.
There are two great shots in basketball: the uncontested layup/dunk, and the wide-open three-pointer.
You contend that it's hard to make an entry pass to the post.
Have you noticed that, in recent years, defensive players rotate a lot more ... in man defenses, the weakside defenders play off their man and help clog up the post.
That makes it inadvisable to try to pass it inside when a proficient big is double-teammed before the ball gets there.
The better method to create an open shot is crisp passing (the ball moves faster than the feet), getting defenders a half step behind. It opens up not only better shots but better lanes to the basket.
And, yes, as you contend, a drive and dish is very effective.

Here's the other point. Obviously your references are to low mid-major level basketball.
So, here's a question for you: How many teams at Maine's level have a quality "big," at least 6-foot-8.
There are only so many individuals 6-8 or taller on earth. There's an even smaller percentage that have some athletic gifts. The all matriculate at the higher levels, leaving teams of Maine's levels without quality bigs.
When is the last time Maine had a legit 6-8+ player who averaged, say,16 or 17 points per game?
Other than Warney, at Stony Brook a couple of years ago, what America East team had a legit, effective 6-8 player?


Maine19Fan: I didn't mean to contend that it is hard to pass the ball inside to the post. It is hard to get the perimeter players to even look inside when they get the ball facing the basket, let alone give it to them. If the spacing is correct if the double down is before the post player on the block gets the ball that still means a perimeter player is open for a perimeter pass for an open three if he is a good 3 point shooter or if he isn't then just cut to the opposite block for a free open layup from pass from the perimeter player with the ball.

The secret is the floor spacing it must be so that the defense has to pay a big price if they double team the post player on the block when he gets he ball or before he gets the ball.

Post player on the block ball side. Wings even with the free throw line extended outside the 3 point line and the 2 guard s even with the free throw lane extended up to the 3 point line outside the 3 point arc on both sides. Literally a 2-2-1 offense spacing set up. This formation forces the defense to either allow the post player to go one on one on the toughest spot on the floor to defend without fouling or forces the defense to double down to double team before the post player gets the ball or after he gets the ball. After any player passes the ball he screens away any perimeter player he so chooses.

If a perimeter player passes the ball to a perimeter player and he does not screen away he can stay which is the signal for the post man to rear screen him and they swap positions or the passer can run a give an go cut and the post player always goes ball side looking for the ball. The move the player who passed the ball is determined how the defense is playing him after he makes the pass. He can screen away, stay for a rear screen, run a give and go cut, can go screen the ball, go get the ball back from the player he passed to or fake one of thise moves and then run his own back door cut. Offensive move sets that are determined by the player who passed the ball either to a perimeter teammate or the post player. Free lance in a set of offensive moves. What can a player do after he passes the ball to a teammate.1. pass and screen away 2. pass screen to the ball, 3. pass and give and go.4. pass and stay, 5. pass fake and run a back door, 6. or move and go get the ball back. With so much action and movement of players it is hard for the defense to double the ball without giving up an open three or an open layup.

All this action and the player with the ball on the perimeter is looking to get the ball inside to the post player and if he can;t because pf the doubl team then he looks for the open teammate whose man is doubling down for an open three or to the opposite block for an open layup.

Sometimes we used the traffic light signal. Red post player on the block touches ball once before we shoot it unless it is a layup. Yellow, caution because of over denial play so fake to passer and that signals for tammate you want to pass to to go backdoor cut and green light take the first good open shot you can get. We just held up the color we wanted them to run through to get te open shot.

All of our players knew how to seal their defenders on the block, show where they want the pass, signal when they want the ball by wiggling their fingers and to close that fist when they are being denied so that the passer can ball fake the bpass then the defnder jumps towards the fake and the post player rolls to the basket or f the post is being completely fronted then to hve the post lean against the fronting defender show the passer where he wants the ball with his arm extneded and the other arm and hand grabbing his own shirt so he won't be called for a push off foul. When he leaves for the pass the defender usually loses his balance and because the post players free hand is grabbing his own shirt there is not foul aand he is open for the pass and an easy two.

All our players could post up with the skills I mentioned above so it did not matter who was on the block on a reset or continuty play.Pass and do something and player with ball look inside for the [ost player and then ook for the open man if there is a doublr down on the post player on the block.

We shot a lot of old fashioned threes because we lived on the line. When we took a 3 it was always a wide open three because of the double down on the block before the block player got the ball or after he got the ball.

Key post player on the block is always ball side, 2 wings have to be outside the 3 point line even with the foul line extended and the guards outside the 3 point line and even with each other in ine with the free throw lane line extended. Great spacing an closest player to doubl the post was the wing player on the same side as the post player is on. Many time we could either get the ball directly from the guard after he picked up his dribble if it was one on one on the block or the open three if thedefnder on the ball side wing was doing th doublig for an open 3.

Also we only dribbled the ball once the offense was started was if the player with the ball could not pass to any of his 4 teammates and that was because pf denial defense so he just dribble penetrated as there was no help defense because pf the denial and usually ends up 2 on 1 with the post player on the block.

Passing offense with a dribble escape.
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Re: D-1 Men's College basketball 3 point percentages

Postby Maine19Fan » Tue Dec 19, 2017 9:02 am

Lot easier to coach against low-level high school players than it is to coach against the St. Joe's of the world.
Lot easier to coach when you've got more talent than the opposition.
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